Of The 4 Types of Managers, Only This 1 is Truly Effective

Of The 4 Types of Managers, Only This 1 is Truly Effective was originally published on Fairygodboss.

Today’s managers aren’t expected to simply manage, but act as a coach and develop the talent of their team. (To prove the point of this current thinking, see this recent story in Harvard Business Review, “You Can’t Be a Great Manager if You’re Not a Good Coach” and this article from Gallup, “Why Your Managers Should Be Like Coaches (Not Bosses.)”

But according to global research and advisory firm Gartner, not all managers are born coaches, and 65% of their employees say their managers are ineffective.

There are four types of managers, said Jaime Roca, senior vice president, Gartner, last week during a panel at Gartner IT Symposium/Xpo.

And not all four are equally effective.

As it turned out, the Always On Manager does more harm than good, and has a negative impact on employee performance of -8%, according to a survey by Gartner of 7,000 employees measuring manager effectiveness. The constant feedback and coaching is overkill for an employee, who has trouble distinguishing what is filler and what they actually need to hear. Eventually, many will check out.

The Teacher and Cheerleader boost employee performance by 7% and 9%, respectively, but it’s the Connector Manager that triples the likelihood that their direct reports will be high performers. They provide everything in just the right measure – providing targeted feedback in their area of expertise, creating a positive team environment for development, and they can augment their utility by connecting employees to others for coaching and development when something falls outside their range of expertise.

Wondering what type of manager you are? Take the quiz yourself.

— Sheila McClear

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This story originally appeared on Ladders

By Sheila McClear - Fairygodboss
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